Gastrointestinal Cancer

PV QA 1 - Poster Viewing Q&A 1

SU_7_2067 - Effect of Patient Companionship on Patients With Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

Sunday, October 21
1:15 PM - 2:45 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Effect of Patient Companionship on Patients With Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiotherapy
J. K. Ho1, B. Gui2, J. Yoon1, Q. Zhang3, A. Zhang1, S. L. Manne4, and S. K. Jabbour2; 1Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, 2Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Department of Radiation Oncology, New Brunswick, NJ, 3First People's Hospital of Huaian, Huaian, China, 4Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ

Purpose/Objective(s): Marital status has been widely demonstrated to have influence on the outcome of cancer treatment. Compared to marital status, patient companionship may be more meaningful in daily practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of patient companionship on treatment outcome and treatment tolerance in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT).

Materials/Methods: Retrospectively, patients with esophageal cancer pursuing dCRT from 1/1/05 to 1/1/16 were included. Patients’ marital status, companionship in each visit, baseline performance status, changes of albumin and weight, tumor response after therapy, and overall survival were reviewed. Patients were divided by the frequency of companionship (< /≥50% visits). Patients’ characteristics, treatment outcome and tolerance, and overall survival were compared by X2, Wilcoxon-rank test and Kaplan-Meier analysis.

Results: Of 59 patients (39 males and 20 females with mean age of 66.0 years), 35 patients had frequent companionship (≥50%) in all documented visits while 24 patients were categorized into the group of infrequent companionship. There was no significant difference in ECOG performance status or pre-diagnosis weight loss between the two groups (P=0.44, 0.50 respectively). Patients with frequent companionship maintained their weight better than those with infrequent companionship (median 2.7 kg weight loss vs. 4.9 kg weight loss, P=0.04, median of weight loss proportion 3.3% vs. 5.9%, P=0.09). Patients with frequent companionship compared to those with infrequent companionship had a non-significantly greater chance of hospitalization after dCRT (62.9% vs. 37.5%, P=0.06) due to toxicities of treatment. There was neither a difference in Grade 3/4 leukopenia nor the change in albumin throughout the therapy between the two groups (P=0.66, 0.42 respectively). No overall survival difference was demonstrated between the two groups (P=0.98).

Conclusion: Although frequent companionship did not show survival benefit in esophageal cancer after dCRT, its effect on treatment tolerance may be favorable in cancer treatment. Patients with companionship may be more likely to seek care if they are more ill and require hospitalization. The specific reasons for these hospitalizations need further investigation.

Author Disclosure: J.K. Ho: None. B. Gui: None. Q. Zhang: None. S.L. Manne: None. S.K. Jabbour: Research Grant; Merck.

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