Head and Neck Cancer

PV QA 2 - Poster Viewing Q&A 2

MO_25_2586 - Real-world plaque brachytherapy clinical practices among Ocular Oncology Study Consortium treatment centers

Monday, October 22
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Real-world plaque brachytherapy clinical practices among Ocular Oncology Study Consortium treatment centers
C. Binder1, R. J. Crilly1, P. Mruthyunjaya2, M. Seider3, A. Schefler4, and A. Skalet1; 1Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 2Byers Eye Institute, Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, 3The Permanente Medical Group at UCSF, San Francisco, CA, San Francisco, CA, 4Retina Consultants of Houston, Houston, TX

Purpose/Objective(s): Planning for I-125 plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma has advanced in recent years, allowing for image-guided planning and improved dosimetry. In order to compare real-world treatment practices, this study reports practice patterns at institutions from the Ocular Oncology Study Consortium (OOSC).

Materials/Methods: Information regarding plaque brachytherapy clinical practices was obtained from the OOSC database and a treatment practice survey. The OOSC database contains information from 9 U.S. referral centers regarding tumor characteristics and treatment parameters for 428 subjects treated between 2010 and 2014. The survey queried treatment planning methods and prescriptions and was completed by 7 of the OOSC institutions.

Results: The majority of institutions follow American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) and American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidelines with regard to dose and prescription point. Actual dosimetry methodology varied between institutions with median apical dose of 85Gy and dose rate of 78cGy/hr. Safety margins generally adhered to the 2-3mm guideline but were larger in some cases, particularly for notched plaques or anterior tumors. 85% of institutions used pre-loaded plaques while all institutions incorporate eye plaque specific planning software. Normal tissue constraints are not used at most institutions.

Conclusion: While there were differences in dosimetric practices, there was overall good agreement among plaque brachytherapy practices at the participating institutions including prescription dose, safety margins, and planning methodology. Although there is no FDA-approved eye plaque treatment planning software, all institutions responding to the survey utilize such software. However, dose-rates varied between institutions and in some cases fell outside of ABS guidelines. Improved planning technology may allow for more uniform dose calculations to normal structures and improved tumor dosimetry, thereby minimizing radiation toxicity. Further studies are required to refine uncertainties in planning and determine a minimally effective dose.

Author Disclosure: C. Binder: None. R.J. Crilly: None. P. Mruthyunjaya: None.

Christina Binder, MD, PhD

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Christina Binder


Assets

MO_25_2586 - Real-world plaque brachytherapy clinical practices among Ocular Oncology Study Consortium treatment centers



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Real-world plaque brachytherapy clinical practices among Ocular Oncology Study Consortium treatment centers