Head and Neck Cancer

PV QA 2 - Poster Viewing Q&A 2

MO_27_2649 - Incidence and Outcomes of HPV-associated Head and Neck Cancers in the United States: A Large Population-Based Analysis

Monday, October 22
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Incidence and Outcomes of HPV-associated Head and Neck Cancers in the United States: A Large Population-Based Analysis
B. A. Mahal1, P. S. Catalano2, and D. N. Margalit3; 1Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Department of Biostatistics & Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Purpose/Objective(s): Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal cancers are increasing in the United States (US); yet there are no large epidemiologic studies to define the national burden of HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) of oropharynx and non-oropharynx subsites.

Materials/Methods: A custom Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database identified 5,936 patients with HNSCC (oropharynx, nasopharynx, hypopharynx, or other pharynx) and known HPV status, diagnosed from 2013-2014. Age-adjusted HPV-positive HNSCC incidence rates per 100,000 persons were calculated using SEER*Stat. Associations between HPV status and cancer-specific mortality (CSM) were determined using multivariable Fine-Gray competing-risks regression.

Results: From 2013-2014, the US incidence of HPV-positive versus negative HNSCC was 2.43 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.35-2.50) versus 1.28 (1.22-1.33) per 100,000 persons, respectively. HPV-positive incidence was 2.26 (2.19-2.34), 0.06 (0.05-0.07), 0.06 (0.05-0.07), and 0.04 (0.01-0.03) for oropharynx, nasopharynx, hypopharynx, and other pharynx HNSCC, respectively. White (2.80, 2.71-2.90), non-Hispanic (2.68, 2.59-2.77) and male patients (4.38, 4.23-4.53) had the highest incidences of HPV-positive disease, with a unimodal age incidence distribution peaking at ages 60-64 (8.04, 7.49-8.62); notably, non-Hispanic white men ages 60-64 had an incidence of 18.56 (17.09-20.13). HPV-positive disease was associated with lower CSM in oropharynx HNSCC (Adjusted Hazard Ratio [AHR] 0.40, P<0.001; 23-month CSM 4.5% versus 11.2%), but not in non-oropharynx HNSCC (AHR 1.08, P=0.81; 23-month CSM 12.2% versus 11.4%), Poropharynx*HPV interaction =0.002.

Conclusion: This large epidemiological study defines the US burden of HPV-associated HNSCC. The highest incidence of US incidence of HPV-positive HNSCC was in non-Hispanic white men, where it represents the sixth most common non-skin solid malignancy in patients 64 and younger. The favorable prognosis associated with HPV appears to be limited to the oropharynx.

Author Disclosure: B.A. Mahal: None. P.S. Catalano: None. D.N. Margalit: Research Grant; NCCN.

Brandon Mahal, MD

Brigham and Women's Hopsital

Disclosure:
No relationships to disclose.

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