Radiation Oncology History/Education/Social Media

PV QA 3 - Poster Viewing Q&A 3

TU_44_2916 - Implementation of Resident-Driven Art and Humanities Curriculum to Improve Wellness in Radiation Oncology: Preliminary Results

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Implementation of Resident-Driven Art and Humanities Curriculum to Improve Wellness in Radiation Oncology: Preliminary Results
T. Kaleem, and L. A. Vallow; Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL

Purpose/Objective(s): Art and Humanities in medicine has been significantly lacking in resident education. Art therapy is a proven technique to improve mental health outcomes that can be applied to residents in order to improve wellness. In an effort to improve resident exposure to art therapeutic techniques and evaluate burnout related endpoints including stress, vitality, and motivation, a Resident- run humanities curriculum was implemented.

Materials/Methods: Starting in May 2017, Art therapy sessions were designed and led by a Resident with previous Art Experience. One hour sessions were designed to reflect and discuss the experience of being a member or resident in Radiation Oncology department through an art form. Baseline surveys were taken prior to starting the session, including demographic information, exposure to art, stress level, fatigue, motivation, and vitality. Participants also took Post- Activity surveys to evaluate changes in stress, fatigue, mood, vitality and motivation. Sessions were geared for residents, but the whole department was invited to participate. Art supplies were funded by the Radiation Oncology department.

Results: There have been three art therapy sessions, one hour each, since the implementation of the curriculum. Number of participants ranges 3-8 participants each session. Majority of participants fall in the 25-29 age groups. Two participants were consultants, greater than 45 years old. All participants had previous exposure to artistic expression, however only one was currently enrolled in an art program outside of work. A total of 16 surveys were completed for all three sessions. Composite averages of endpoints on survey showed baseline current rotation stress 4.625 (0-10 high), pre activity stress level 4.25 (0-10 high), fatigue 4.75, (0-10 worn-out), excitement to be a doctor 5.0625 (0-10 love job), pre-activity mood 6.0 (0-10 Very happy), pre-activity vitality 5.37 (0-10 full of pep) and motivation (0-10 very motivated). Post- activity survey results showed a decrease in stress by 1.13 points, a decrease in fatigue by 1.56 points, and an improvement in excitement by 1.125 points, mood by 1.25 points, vitality by 2 points and motivation by 1.75 points.

Conclusion: Overall, the resident driven art therapy sessions for residents and faculty showed positive improvement in all burnout related endpoints and wellness categories. Further sessions and participation are required to characterize the degree of improvement. We plan to continue sessions incorporating other art forms, such as dance, sculpture, and writing. These sessions are easily reproducible and can be implemented in all residency programs across specialties to improve wellness.

Author Disclosure: T. Kaleem: None. L.A. Vallow: None.

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