Radiation Oncology History/Education/Social Media

PV QA 3 - Poster Viewing Q&A 3

TU_44_2918 - Perceptions and Patterns in Academic Publishing: A Survey of United States Residents in Radiation Oncology

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Perceptions and Patterns in Academic Publishing: A Survey of United States Residents in Radiation Oncology
A. Koroulakis1, S. R. Rice1, N. Knight2, and E. M. Nichols2; 1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Purpose/Objective(s): To assess perceptions of, and residency-specific training regarding, the publishing process among U.S. radiation oncology residents, with a specific focus on their awareness and understanding of criteria for selecting appropriate and legitimate peer-reviewed journals for academic publishing.

Materials/Methods: A nationwide survey was opened electronically to residents of all ACGME-accredited radiation oncology programs in the United States. Surveys were distributed to program directors, program coordinators and/or chief residents at each institution as outlined in the Association for Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) directory. The survey focused on three categories: 1. Demographic questions (level of training, location, number of publications), 2. Specific questions pertaining to appropriate submission, peer review, and publication of academic research, and 3. Subjective ranking of a number of factors important for choosing an appropriate publisher/journal. Results were stratified by level of training as well as number of publications.

Results: Overall, 137 of 690 residents (19.8%) responded with a 98% (134/137) completion rate. All levels of training were equally represented (PGY2, 21.9%; PGY3, 26.3%; PGY4, 27.7%; PGY5, 24.1%). The number of peer-reviewed journal publications for the group was: 0 (9.5%), 1-5 (41.6%), 5-10 (22.6%), 10-15 (14.6%) and >15 (11.7%). Sixteen of 137 (11.7%) residents reported formal training in manuscript preparation and choosing academic journals for submission. Only 3.7% of residents reported departmental guidelines regarding publication in “predatory” journals; 57.4% were unsure. The three most important factors influencing publisher/journal choice were: impact factor (first for 59.1%), whether a given journal is found in a major index (first for 17.6%), and association with a reputable professional or scientific organization (first for 17.1%). While impact factor was most important overall, its importance increased with number of publications (47.7% of residents with 0-5 publications compared to 71.2% of residents with >5 publications). Cost considerations influenced journal choice at least once for 68 (51.1%) and more than once for 48 (35.8%) residents. Cost consideration was ranked the 5th most important factor when selecting a journal.

Conclusion: The majority of polled residents consider impact factor most important when choosing an appropriate publisher, increasing in importance with number of publications per resident. Although cost consideration was among the lower ranked of polled factors, it influenced choice of journal in over half of respondents. A minority had formal training in choosing appropriate academic journals, knowing how to identify so-called “predatory” journals, or were aware if their department has proscriptions regarding publication in said journals. Formal training in manuscript preparation and choosing academic journals for radiation oncology residents is warranted.

Author Disclosure: A. Koroulakis: None. S.R. Rice: None. E.M. Nichols: None.

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