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TU_44_2917 - The Resident Individual Development Plan as a Guide for Radiation Oncology Mentorship

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

The Resident Individual Development Plan as a Guide for Radiation Oncology Mentorship
H. C. Ko1, and R. J. Kimple2; 1Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI, 2University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI

Purpose/Objective(s): Individual development plans (IDPs) have long been a facet of graduate science education to formalize and address a trainee’s career goals at regular intervals. Despite the similarities of physician and scientist training, the community of graduate medical education at large currently does not employ this technique. At our institution, we have assessed a pilot of a resident IDP (rIDP) for resident physician trainees.

Materials/Methods: We instituted the rIDP within the 8-resident radiation oncology training program. Participants were given an 18-question pre-test survey addressing aspects of strengths, weaknesses, as well as a 1-, 2-, and 5- year plan, answered on a Likert scale. Afterwards, each participant underwent an online self-assessment of their radiation oncology-specific skills and goals, which served to guide a one-on-one discussion with a faculty member. The same 18 questions were given as a post-test survey.

Results: From 2016-2017, a total of 9 residents participated. Three out of nine (33.3 %) participants had not previously heard of an IDP. In general, participants expressed confidence with most areas of clinical training (e.g., treatment planning, and managing toxicities), but felt deficient in the areas of billing, coding, and negotiating insurance. After individual discussion with faculty, participants were statistically more likely to “agree” or “strongly agree” in the areas of: formal career goals, confidence in the 1-year plan, and the strength of the mentor-mentee relationship.

Conclusion: We report the first use of an IDP in a radiation oncology residency training program. Our initial results appear to document positive changes in the likelihood that participants have a specific career plan in place. Additionally, areas where residents self-identified as “less comfortable”, as in billing and coding, were used to update the resident curriculum. Future directions include the long-term follow up to assess the effects of the IDP in early career radiation oncologists.

Author Disclosure: H.C. Ko: None. R.J. Kimple: Employee; University of Wisconsin. Research Grant; Threshold Pharmaceuticals, Peloton Therapeutics, American Cancer Society, National Institute of Health, V Foundation for Cancer Research.

Huaising Ko, MD

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