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TU_45_2925 - A Pilot Curriculum for Transitioning from 2D to 3D Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning in Low Income Countries (LIC): Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) as a model.

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

A Pilot Curriculum for Transitioning from 2D to 3D Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning in Low Income Countries (LIC): Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) as a model.
C. R. Nwachukwu1, T. Banks1, J. Murray2, L. Omar3, and L. Million1; 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, 2Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, 3RADAID International, Sutton, United Kingdom

Purpose/Objective(s): Transitioning from 2D to 3D radiation therapy can be very challenging for facilities in low resource settings due to lack of training, unfamiliarity with the treatment planning system, and inadequate technology. Using Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) as a model for low income countries (LICs), we sought to identify specific obstacles that could be overcome and use that knowledge to develop a formal teaching curriculum for 3D treatment planning and delivery.

Materials/Methods: During an onsite visit in 2016, a targeted needs assessment was performed which included interviews of staff (clinical radiation oncologists, residents, radiographers, and medical physicists) at KNH as well as direct observation of radiation treatments. The results of these interviews and observations were analyzed to develop goals and objectives for specific educational strategies. We implemented our pilot curriculum at KNH for one week in July 2017 and assessed the success of the program with pre- and post-curriculum debriefings with the staff.

Results: The targeted needs assessment identified that the refurbished linac installed in March 2016 was only treating between 5-15 patients/day as compared with 3-4 times this number of patients on their cobalt machines. The barriers to increasing the number of patients treated on the linac included technological problems such as with on board imaging, limited contouring knowledge, and unfamiliarity with the 3D planning system. The pilot curriculum included daily teaching/didactic sessions led by clinical radiation oncologists, a medical physicist, and radiation therapists. This was followed by hands-on training teaching the basic’s of radiation therapy contouring and dosimetry. Our post-curriculum debriefing sessions demonstrated improvements in the participants’ knowledge and workflow compared to prior to these sessions. Clinicians felt more competent in contouring target volumes and delineating normal tissues/organs. Physicists were more confident with 3D treatment planning, and radiographers felt more confident with radiation treatment set ups and treatment.

Conclusion: It is possible to design and implement a simple pilot curriculum to help transition from 2D to 3D treatment planning by on-site training. Overall, the staff at KNH were eager to learn current treatment techniques and found the curriculum was successful in achieving this goal. Our future goals include ongoing in country hands on training and development of distance based training modules. Standardization of this simple teaching curriculum can be adopted to other LICs.

Author Disclosure: C.R. Nwachukwu: None. T. Banks: None. J. Murray: None. L. Omar: None. L. Million: None.

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TU_45_2925 - A Pilot Curriculum for Transitioning from 2D to 3D Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning in Low Income Countries (LIC): Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) as a model.



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