Health Services Research

PV QA 3 - Poster Viewing Q&A 3

TU_40_2992 - Long-Term Trends in Use of Peripheral a-Adrenergic Antagonist and Antispasmodic Medications after Local Prostate Cancer Therapy: Evidence from a National Survey

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Long-Term Trends in Use of Peripheral α-Adrenergic Antagonist and Antispasmodic Medications after Local Prostate Cancer Therapy: Evidence from a National Survey
A. N. Slade, M. R. Waters, S. Zhao, and N. Serrano; Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA

Purpose/Objective(s): Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) are common among patients who undergo local therapy for prostate cancer, and peripherally acting α antagonists and antispasmodics are two common classes of medications that are used to control these symptoms. The long-term trajectory of medication use after definitive therapy for prostate cancer in the community setting is unknown. We use data from a nationally representative cohort to determine the prevalence of the use of drugs and the average length that individuals remain on these treatments after definitive therapy.

Materials/Methods: We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey from 2001-2009 to identify 316 men who received local therapy for their prostate cancer. A prescription list was part of the survey. Chi-squared tests were used to compare the use of peripheral α adrenergic antagonists (e.g. tamsulosin) and antispasmodics (e.g. oxybutynin) among patients who completed local therapy for prostate cancer at differing time points relative to the survey. Multivariate regression analyses were also used to adjust results for demographic, socioeconomic and health-related characteristics.

Results: Of the 316 men who received local therapy for prostate cancer, 136 (43%) received surgery alone, 125 (40%) received radiotherapy alone, and 55 (17%) received both. An average of 6.3 years elapsed between the cancer diagnosis and survey. Alpha-antagonist use was most prevalent in patients receiving radiotherapy (20%). Alpha antagonist use declined over time, from 23% of patients reporting use within the first year after diagnosis, to 4% at 11 years or more after diagnosis (p<0.01). By contrast, antispasmodic use remained at approximately 5% regardless of the time elapsed since diagnosis. On multivariate analysis, patients who received radiation alone were more likely to report taking an α antagonist compared to surgical patients (OR 6.2; p<0.01) , whereas those receiving both radiation and surgery were less likely to report taking an α-antagonists compared to surgery-alone patients (OR=0.25; p<0.05). Patients diagnosed > 10 years before the survey were less likely to take an α antagonist compared to those diagnosed within 1 year of the survey (OR 0.16; p<0.05). Conversely, surgical patients were more likely to receive antispasmodic medications compared to radiation patients (OR=9.2; p<0.05). However, there was no significant relationship between duration since diagnosis and use of antispasmodics.

Conclusion: Antispasmodic and α antagonist use is common among patients who have received local therapy for their prostate cancer, with radiotherapy patients more likely to report higher levels of alpha adrenergic antagonist use, and surgical patients with higher use of antispasmodics. However, whereas use of α-antagonists declined over time, antispasmodic use did not. These findings underscore the potential long term ramifications of worsening urinary symptoms after local therapy for prostate cancer.

Author Disclosure: A.N. Slade: None. M.R. Waters: None. S. Zhao: None.

Send Email for Alexander Slade


Assets

TU_40_2992 - Long-Term Trends in Use of Peripheral a-Adrenergic Antagonist and Antispasmodic Medications after Local Prostate Cancer Therapy: Evidence from a National Survey



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Long-Term Trends in Use of Peripheral a-Adrenergic Antagonist and Antispasmodic Medications after Local Prostate Cancer Therapy: Evidence from a National Survey