Patient Reported Outcomes/Quality of Life

PV QA 4 - Poster Viewing Q&A 4

TU_44_3751 - Patterns of Survivorship Care and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Treatment for Extremity Sarcoma

Tuesday, October 23
2:45 PM - 4:15 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

Patterns of Survivorship Care and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Treatment for Extremity Sarcoma
J. E. Shabason1, M. Frick1, C. Vachani2, K. Arnold-Korzeniowski2, C. Bach2, M. K. Hampshire2, J. M. Metz3, and C. E. Hill-Kayser1; 1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA

Purpose/Objective(s): Patients treated for extremity sarcoma face long-term treatment-related morbidities and therefore require specialized follow-up survivorship care. We sought to assess patient-reported outcomes and experiences with survivorship care in survivors of extremity sarcoma.

Materials/Methods: Seventy-eight survivors of extremity sarcoma who utilized an Internet-based customized Survivorship Care Plan tool between 2008 and 2017 were included in the analysis. Patient reported toxicity and survivorship care were extracted from patient survey responses.

Results: The median age of diagnosis was 36 years, 58% were female and 82% were Caucasian. The majority of patients (88%) received multimodal treatment -- 97% underwent surgery, 53% received radiotherapy, and 65% chemotherapy (most common drugs ifosfamide and doxorubicin). The most common patient-reported toxicities were fatigue (53%), loss of limb flexibility (50%), sensori-motor problems (44%), cognitive changes (42%), peripheral neuropathy (32%), sexual changes (31%), and chronic swelling (21%). A minority of patients reported receiving a survivorship care plan (9%) or treatment summary (14%) by their oncologist. Patients treated at university centers were more likely to have been offered survivorship care plans (17% vs 0%, p=0.02). Patients were less likely to receive specialized follow-up care from an oncologist over time from active treatment, with 92% seeing their oncologist at 2 years, 75% from 2-5 years, and 55% at >5 years from treatment (p=0.009). Survivors treated at university centers were more likely to receive follow-up care from an oncologist over time.

Conclusion: In this cohort of survivors of extremity sarcoma, many experienced long-term treatment-related morbidities; however, only a minority received a survivorship care plan, and nearly half did not receive follow-up care from an oncologist after 5 years, despite the risk of treatment-related morbidity and cancer recurrence. Survivors treated at a university center were more likely to receive survivorship care plans and specialized follow-up care, suggesting a need for greater education regarding survivorship after sarcoma in the community setting.

Author Disclosure: J.E. Shabason: None. M. Frick: None. C. Vachani: None. K. Arnold-Korzeniowski: None. C. Bach: None. M.K. Hampshire: None. J.M. Metz: None. C.E. Hill-Kayser: Employee; University of Pennsylvania.

Jacob Shabason, MD, MS

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jacob Shabason


Assets

TU_44_3751 - Patterns of Survivorship Care and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Treatment for Extremity Sarcoma



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Patterns of Survivorship Care and Patient-Reported Outcomes after Treatment for Extremity Sarcoma