Radiation and Cancer Physics

SS 42 - Physics 13 - Treatment Delivery Techniques

306 - Can Virtual Reality, Interactive Game, and Body Motion Sensors be a Replacement for General Anesthesia in Children Receiving Radiation Therapy ?

Wednesday, October 24
3:25 PM - 3:35 PM
Location: Room 303

Can Virtual Reality, Interactive Game, and Body Motion Sensors be a Replacement for General Anesthesia in Children Receiving Radiation Therapy ?
H. B. Giap; California Protons Cancer Therapy Center, San Diego, CA

Purpose/Objective(s):

To keep some young patients still during the daily radiation treatment (XRT) requires general anesthesia, which is expensive, time demanding, and has short and long term consequences to these young patients. This study investigate a noninvasive technique using virtual reality (VR), interactive game, and body motion sensors to keep young patients to remain still during XRT, in place of general anesthesia

Materials/Methods:

The proposed VR system consists of: (1) Head Mounted Display (HMD) that can display 3-D 1080p video and audio; (2) Multiple wireless motion sensors attached to body, arms and legs; (3) multi-level 3-D games(4) the computer system that incorporates all these components and provide output to patients and technicians. The bluetooth motion sensors have 6 degree of freedom and provide instantaneous motion signal (rotation and translation) and are integrated into the game play. The game component will feature patient as an avatar flying an aero-skateboard to help mother dinosaur to collect all the lost eggs through multiple terrains (game levels) of forest, desert, mountain, etc. Positive feedback given as scores and bonus throughout the process to stimulate the patient during the 30-45 minute duration of the treatment. Once the patient is set in the reference position (, i.e., simulation position) and the game starts, as long as the patient remains still, the avatar will fly and collect eggs with different colors and adding scores. If motion of any body parts is detected above certain set threshold, the avatar is stopped, and warning is given to patients and therapist computer console indicating which part of needed to be still or resume to reference position. Once this is done, the game resumes. The therapist can hear and see what patients see, and there are two-way communication between patients and therapist. At the end of the session, depending on the score, the patient will be rewarded with toys.

Results:

A prototype has been developed and have been tested in 15 healthy young children from age 4 to 10. After a few attempts, all children can comprehend and remain still for at least 30 min. Some adjustments in the gameplay and additional game levels were made to keep patients engaged.

Conclusion:

The proposed VR system can potentially offer an alternative to general anesthesia in some children undergoing XRT. This can significantly reduce morbidity, cost, and inefficiency in the radiation treatment of pediatric population. The next step is to perform a pilot clinical study on actual pediatric patients undergoing radiation treatments.

Author Disclosure: H.B. Giap: None.

Huan Giap, MD, PhD

Disclosure:
Employment
California Proton Cancer Treatment Center: Radiation Oncologist: inventor and founder; eviCore Healthcare: Associated Medical Reviewer

Compensation
TAE Life Sciences; Varian Medical Systems

Ownership
Virtual Reality Medical Applications: inventer and founderPatent/License Fees/Copyright

Leadership
Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group: Chair of Publication SubCommittee

Biography:
Huan Giap, MD, PhD
Radiation Oncologist - California Proton Cancer Treatment Center
Volunteer Clinical Professor, University of California at San Diego
Co-Editor-in-Chief for the Translational Cancer Research Journal
Co-Editor-in-Chief for the International Journal of Medical Physics, Clinical Engineering, and Radiation Oncology.
Co-chairperson of the Publication Committee of PTCOG (Particle Beam Therapy Co-Operative Group)

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Huan Giap


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