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TU_41_3003 - The CAROLE Study: An Adaptive Checklist to Improve Efficiency

Tuesday, October 23
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
Location: Innovation Hub, Exhibit Hall 3

The CAROLE Study: An Adaptive Checklist to Improve Efficiency
E. Rooney1, A. Laxer1, S. Ramoutarpersaud2, L. Lee1, and L. Puckett2; 1Department of Radiation Medicine, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Northwell Health, Lake Success, NY, 2Northwell Health, Lake Success, NY

Purpose/Objective(s): In a multi-disciplinary clinical trial, one of the largest challenges is creating a workflow that ensures the project runs smoothly and efficiently. It is essential to have cooperation among diverse stakeholders, and a clear plan ensuring all necessary steps are taken for each participant. We hypothesized that creating and distributing an adaptive checklist for the multi-departmental CAROLE Study would improve patient experience, wait times, number of staff complaints, and patient attendance.

Materials/Methods: The CAROLE Study is a collaboration between six medical departments and five research coordination sites. During the initial three weeks of recruitment period, there were difficulties with patient attendance and long wait times, leading to staff complaints and negative patient experiences. In week four, the adaptive checklist was enacted to address these initial concerns and provide a structural framework for future changes. Checklist sub-sections included: “Pre-Appointment”, “Day of”, and “Post- Appointment”. Two medical students oversaw checklist completion, compiled staff complaints, and surveyed patients regarding their overall experience. Staff members and participants provided input towards amendments. Participants were defined as individuals who consented by phone to participate prior to their imaging appointment. Wait times were defined as the time from when participants signed consent to until their first imaging.

Results: Before checklist implementation (n=6), 67% of participants did not show up for their appointments, and 0% called in advance to cancel. Feedback during this time included four staff complaints of appointment delay. The average wait time was 45 minutes, and 50% of patients had a positive experience. Following implementation (n=30), 3% of participants were “no shows”, and 10% cancelled during the confirmation call. During this time, there was 1 staff complaint of appointment delay, and 97% of patients reported positive experiences. Average wait time decreased to 15 minutes.

Conclusion: Implementation of this adaptive checklist in the CAROLE Study improved patient experience, wait times, number of staff complaints, and patient attendance. This project represents a pilot project with a small size, however, the procedures involved were easily implemented by staff and with high compliance. The adaptive checklist will continue to be amended based on feedback from study contributors and participants to maximize efficiency of the CAROLE Study. In the future, this checklist can be used by other researchers to maintain the quality of workflow established in this trial.

Author Disclosure: E. Rooney: None. A. Laxer: None. S. Ramoutarpersaud: None. L. Lee: None. L. Puckett: None.

Lindsay Puckett, MD

Northwell Health

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