Innovation & Research Practice

Paper: Research Abstract

Elevating Information Literacy Research in Health Sciences Libraries: A Bibliometric Study

Tuesday, May 7
2:50 PM - 3:05 PM
Room: Columbus GH (East Tower, Ballroom/Gold Level)

Objectives: Information literacy (IL) opens opportunities for health sciences librarians to design research related to library instruction sessions and collaboration with faculty to enhance student learning. There is limited published literature to assess health sciences libraries and librarians’ productivity on IL research. This study aimed to examine the status and characteristics of IL research in health sciences libraries and performed by health sciences librarians over the period of 2008 to 2018.
Methods: Bibliometrics, the statistical analysis of publications, was used to assess the indicators of productivity, collaboration, and impact or visibility on IL research by health sciences librarians. Data was collected from Scopus and Web of Science, two citation databases with multidisciplinary and international scopes. EndNote software was used to remove duplicates and Rayyan was used to systematically screen search results for inclusion. Quantitative analysis was performed, including citation analysis, number of publications per year and per country, the most prolific authors and their affiliations, most prolific journals, number of articles published in library science-related and non-library science-related journals, the origin of the first author’s country, etc.
Results: Of the 3,387 search results, 479 (14.8%) unique articles met the inclusion criteria of being authored by health sciences librarians. Study results showed that the number of included publications on IL increased 13% each year on average with the peak in 2016 (n=62). Over half (54%, n=258) of included articles were published by authors affiliated within the United States. Health Information and Libraries Journal was the most prolific journal that published IL studies in the domain of health sciences librarianship. However, the most highly cited article was published in the Journal of the Medical Library Association. In terms of visibility, 373 (78%) articles have been cited at least once, and the average citation number is 7.8. Authors were highly collaborative with a collaboration index of 2.8.
Conclusions: Over the ten-year period, the volume of IL literature authored by health sciences librarians has increased. Health sciences librarian researchers tend to publish in health sciences library/information journals. This study provides insight for health sciences librarians on IL research and publication practices. Further research might be needed to examine differences in IL publication characteristics after the 2016 implementation of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy.

Alexandria Quesenberry

Assistant Professor/Research & Learning Services Librarian
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Memphis, Tennessee

Alexandria Quesenberry, MSIS, is Assistant Professor/Research & Learning Services Librarian at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) Health Sciences Library in Memphis. She also serves as the library liaison to the College of Nursing. She received her Master of Science in Information Science from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and her Bachelor of Arts in English Literature from Marvyille College. Her research interests include information literacy and library instruction.

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Lin Wu, AHIP

Assistant Director for Research & Learning Services
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Memphis, TN

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